Why earn a degree in healthcare?

Healthcare is a field unlike any other. From residency trained MDs and advanced practice nurses to medical assistants and other support staff, healthcare provides the chance to do important work as part of an interdisciplinary team of dedicated professionals. And there are opportunities at every level. From 2019 to 2029, the industry as a whole is slated for 15% job growth, bringing an estimated 2.4 million new healthcare professionals into the workforce over that ten-year period. Will you be one of them? (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; May 2019. Projections based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed 2020.)

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Industry-wide from 2019 to 2029, the number of jobs opening up in healthcare is expected to increase by 15 percent according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s some 2.4 million new positions that will become available over the course of that ten-year period.

Career Path nursing

Registered nursing provides an entry point at the associate (ADN) or bachelor’s level (BSN), and the chance to earn a master’s (MSN) or doctorate (DNP) to be eligible for certification in one of the four advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) roles as a Nurse Practitioner, Nurse-Midwife, Clinical Nurse Specialist, or Nurse Anesthetist. And with nearly 3.1 million RNs and more than a quarter million APRNs expected to be joining the workforce in the ten-year period from 2019 to 2029, there’s room in the field for dedicated professionals with the right combination of training and credentials. (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; May 2019. Projections based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed Dec 2020.)

Career Path mental-health

The many professions you’ll find in the mental health field are as diverse as the conditions and communities these professionals serve. Across the board, it continues to be a high-needs area of expertise. Over the ten-year period leading up to 2029, nearly 200,000 new licensed psychologists are expected to enter the field, while substance abuse, behavioral disorder and mental health counselors will see a 25% job growth rate, and the number of social workers will increase by 13%. (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; May 2019. Projections based on national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed Dec 2020.)

Career Path medical

The healthcare industry represents the combined efforts of general practice physicians and specialists, nurses and clinical support staff, therapeutic and rehabilitative specialists, and mental health professionals ranging from clinical psychologists to therapists and counselors. It’s a diverse profile of expertise for one industry, bringing in professionals with an equally diverse set of skills and specialties. With the right education and training, you can be part of the community of healthcare professionals working each day to serve the greater good one patient at a time.

Career Path healthcare

In just about any healthcare role you decide to get into, you’ll find that with new discoveries and advancements there is always something new to learn. But it’s a field where new knowledge and skills are built on the clinical experiences you gain over the years. As with nursing, you can often get your foot in the door in a healthcare profession with an associate’s degree or a bachelor’s. As you gain experience and credibility in the field, you can then earn a graduate degree in the same or a related field.